Rothschild Allenby Market – The Guide


Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

Update: the owners of Rothschild Allenby Market run into financial difficulties. This market was closed. And today, in this compound, you can find a Decathlon store. And if you want to see how it was, continue reading the original post.

On One Foot

Food markets became a real trend in Tel-Aviv, and Rothschild Allenby Market is the most recent one (till this date, opened at the end of 2016). These are the new kind of markets. Mostly they have restaurants and places to eat and a few stores where you can find raw materials.

Map

The name Rothschild Allenby Market comes from the corners of the streets this market is located on.

Map of the area:

Parking

Last Friday morning we decided to visit the market and today I am going to tell you about our visit.

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

My favorite nearby parking lot in this area is Beit Hadar which is located on HaRakevet street. From there it’s a five-minute walk to the market.

Russian Embassy House in Tel Aviv, Israel
Russian Embassy House

More info about the Russian Embassy House can be found at: Tel Aviv walks #1.

Entrances

There are two entrances to the Rothschild Allenby Market. One at the corners of Rothschild and Allenby streets and the second one at Yavne street.

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Entrance to Rothschild Allenby Market

At the Market

We were on-site around 9:30, and as expected, the place was still quite empty.

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Rothschild Allenby Market

Liquor store:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Fruits & Vegetables at Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Fruits & Vegetables

Jerusalem Artichoke

Jerusalem Artichoke
Jerusalem Artichoke

Despite its name, the Jerusalem artichoke has no relation to Jerusalem. And it is not a type of artichoke, though the two are distantly related as members of the daisy family. The origin of the “Jerusalem” part of the name is uncertain. Italian settlers in the United States called the plant Girasole, the Italian word for sunflower, because of its resemblance to the garden sunflower. Over time, the name Girasole may have been changed to Jerusalem. The English later corrupted Girasole artichoke (meaning, “sunflower artichoke”) to Jerusalem artichoke.

Source: Wikipedia

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Rothschild Allenby Market

Most of the places in the market are restaurants and there are quite a few food stores. One or two fruits/vegetable stores, one liquor store, one fish store, and the rest are restaurants/ready food stands.

Mosaics on a column:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

Stationary ice cream tricycle:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

Since many places on the market were still closed, we decided to take a short stroll.

Migdal Shalom and Neve Tzedek

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Entrance to Rothschild Allenby Market

When we exited at Allenby street, we thought about where we should go. We saw Migdal Shalom (that can be seen in reflection) and decided to go in that direction.

Rothschild Allenby Market from Allenby street:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Renovated building on Allenby street
Renovated building on Allenby street


You might ask why in the previous photo, I did not shoot wider. The main reason is that I had one lens with me. Yes, all images in this post were made with 50mm, or as some call it, the plastic fantastic. It was intentional, a part of an exercise. Sometimes when you limit yourself (to one lens or in other areas of your life), you force yourself to become more creative.

For example, the first time I did panning not with a wide-angle lens:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Old mailboxes:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Balcony on the second floor:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

I liked the repetitive pattern of the pillars and the lights:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

And do not forget to look up:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel
Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Migdal Shalom

Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv, Israel
Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv

Shalom Meir Tower (Migdal Shalom Meir; commonly known as Migdal Shalom) is an office tower in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was Israel’s first skyscraper. When its construction was completed in 1965, it was the tallest building in the Middle East and rivaled the tallest buildings in Europe in height. To build the tower, the historic Herzliya Hebrew Gymnasium had to be demolished. The Shalom Tower now houses the Tel Aviv Center comprising a number of permanent and temporary exhibitions dedicated to the beginnings and development of Tel Aviv.

Source: Wikipedia

How tall is Migdal Shalom? It has 34 floors and total heights of around 130 meters. Thought in 1965 it was the tallest building, today in Tel Aviv’s skyline it is one of the lowest skyscrapers. Probably for that reason, the viewpoint that was on top of Migdal Shalom was closed. Instead, you can visit the Azrieli Observatory.

We continued towards Neve Tzedek.

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Modern buildings:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Towards landing:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

You can find a dedicated post about this neighborhood at Tel Aviv walk #2 – Neve Tzedek.

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Several additional photos from Neve Tzedek:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel
Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel
Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

Back to Shalom Meir Tower:

Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv, Israel
Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv

Take a look at the following photo:

Urban walk in Tel Aviv, Israel

It looks like a building on top of another building. You can see similar things in other places in Tel Aviv. The entrepreneurs were probably obligated to restore the old building. So they restored it, and on top of it build a new skyscraper.

Back To The Rothschild Allenby Market

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel
Rothschild Allenby Market

It was brunch time and the restaurants started to prepare for the flood of people.

It worth mentioning that several times a week Rothschild Allenby Market is open late (until 2 am). This will allow pub visitors to find food late at night.

This is actually the view on the exit of one of the restrooms:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

Still too early for me:

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

In this market, there is a branch of LaFarina. It is a bakery and a coffee shop. We first met them in Sarona Market, and since then each time we visit Sarona, buy something from them. This time we bought coffee, two salmon sandwiches, and a cake. Everything was fresh and tasty.

Rothschild Allenby Market in Tel Aviv, Israel

Summary

Overall, Rothschild Allenby Market is a small and charming market. If you are in the area and look for something to eat, you should check it out. But, if it is your first visit to such a market, then I would suggest starting with Sarona Market.

If you love markets, then check out Markets In Tel Aviv And Jaffa. And for additional points of interest nearby, see Tel Aviv-Yafo.

Have you ever been to the Rothschild Allenby MarketMarket? Tell us in the comments below.

That’s all for today, and I’ll see you in future travels!

Stay Tuned!

   

Additional Resources

Here are several resources that I created to help travelers: And if you have any questions then check out Useful Information For Tourists To Israel.  
Did not find what you were looking for? Email me at [email protected], and I will do my best to answer your questions.

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