Ein Tina (Ein Notera) Water Hike – Visitors Guide (with Trails)


Ein Tina

Ein Tina (Ein Notera) is located on the slopes of Golan Heights. And there is a loop trail that offers a water hike, pools, a waterfall, and a picnic area. Thus, it is the perfect place for the hot summer days.

Offers:

  • Get 5% off for your next vacation at Isrotel.
  • Get 10% off for your next tour at Bein Harim with coupon code LEV10#12306.

Map

Ein Tina (Ein Notera) nature reserve is located on the western slopes of the Golan Heights, not far from Hula Nature Reserve.

There is a small sign on road #918 pointing to the entrance. The entrance is between Gonen and Gadot. The easiest way to reach this spot is by entering “Ein Tina parking” into Waze.

Map of the area:

Trails

Ein Tina (Ein Notera) water hike offers a loop trail. Here is an interactive map from israelhiking.osm.org.il where this trail is marked:

There are two parking lots at Ein Tina (Ein Notera). One parking lot is close to road #918, and it is accessible to all vehicles. The second parking lot is near Ein Tina. And sometimes (depending on the weather), it can be reached only using an AWD car.

NameColor of the Trail on the Map aboveDescriptionDistance (km)Total climb and descent (meters)Notes
Short Ein Tina loop trailBlackIt starts at Ein Tina pool (the closer parking). Then leads to the waterfall using the green trail and returns via the blue track.0.8130If you prefer hiking only in the water, you can use the green trail in both directions.
Long Ein Tina loop trail Orange and BlackSame as the previous trail, but it starts at the further away parking (near road #918).2.2162

Note: the green trail that leads to the waterfall is quite steep and not recommended for smaller children. So if you have younger children (less than six years old), you can start with the green trail, stop at any point, and return using the same way.

In my case, my older daughter (who is ten years old) had no problem completing the hike. And my younger daughter (who is less than two years old) sat in the backpack baby carrier. Walking with the backpack baby carrier was not that convenient due to low vegetation in some parts of the path, but it is doable.

Entrance Fee

Free.

Opening Hours

You can visit Ein Tina only during the daytime. Or as it is written in the following sign: “It is strictly prohibited to remain in reserve after dark.”

Ein Tina (Ein Notera)
Ein Tina (Ein Notera)

Picnic and Barbeque

The sign also answers several common questions. Lighting fire and setting up tents in Ein Tina is prohibited. However, there are picnic tables and dustbins at Ein Tina.

Is There Always Water in Ein Tina?

The water at Ein Tina comes from a spring. Farmers use some part of that water, and the excess is streamed to the pipes. The waterfall at the top is an end of a tube. Sometimes, after dry winters, farmers may decide to close the pipe. Hence, I would advise having an alternative track or attraction for that scenario (use the interactive map above to find nearby attractions).

Note: we visited in August 2021, and there was plenty of water.

What Should You Bring to the Trail?

Significant parts of this trail have no shade. Thus bring plenty of water, sunscreen, and hats. Moreover, it would help if you had water shoes. The wet trail has plenty of big rocks. Thus water shoes with sturdy soles would be the best alternative.

Restrooms

None.

The Green Trail

And now, let’s start the hike. We left the car at the further parking and started hiking using the green marking.

Parking by road #918 at Ein Tina
Parking by road #918 at Ein Tina

The road from the further away parking to the parking by the picnic area is probably accessible to most vehicles during the summer. And the following puddle was about 20 centimeters deep. But since it is not that far away, we decided to walk.

The road to the closer Ein Tina parking
The road to the closer Ein Tina parking
The road to the closer Ein Tina parking
The road to the closer Ein Tina parking

It took us about 12 minutes to walk from one parking to another.

Ein Tina
Ein Tina

At the closer parking, you can find a picnic area and a pond.

Pond at Ein Tina
Pond at Ein Tina

The pond is not deep, thus to get completely wet, most people lie inside.

Dragonfly
Dragonfly

After a break at the pond, we headed to the wet trail. We used the green trail to climb to the waterfall. And returned using the blue trail.

Ein Tina (Ein Notera)
Ein Tina (Ein Notera)
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina

The wet trail starts with a pool, and then you start hiking uphill.

The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina

A big part of the wet trail has railings, and it makes hiking much more convenient.

The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina

Here are several additional photos from the wet trail:

The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina
The wet trail at Ein Tina

After about fifteen minutes, that section of the wet trail ended, and the path became steeper.

Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Ein Tina

And here we begin our climb:

Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Ein Tina

The climb took us about twenty minutes, and in total, approximately 35 minutes to reach the waterfall (from the closer parking).

Ein Tina Waterfall

Near the meeting point of the green and blue trails, you can find the waterfall.

Blue and Green trails at Ein Tina
Blue and Green trails at Ein Tina

There is a big pipe that causes the waterfall, and there are also several smaller pipes.

Ein Tina Waterfall
Ein Tina Waterfall

The smaller pipes:

Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Crab near the waterfall
Crab near the waterfall

As you can see in the following image, the blue trail (the dry trail) goes through the waterfall. So let’s skip there.

Ein Tina Waterfall
Ein Tina Waterfall

The Blue Trail

This trail does not go through the water, except a short section near the waterfall. Here is how it looks when standing in the water:

Ein Tina Waterfall
Ein Tina Waterfall
Ein Tina Waterfall
Ein Tina Waterfall

Since the blue trail does not have a lot of vegetation, it offers views of the surroundings. Here are several photos:

Ein Tina
Ein Tina
Ein Tina picnic area and pond
Ein Tina picnic area and pond
The blue trail at Ein Tina
The blue trail at Ein Tina
The path down
The path down
Ein Tina Panorama
Ein Tina Panorama

In the following image, to the left (where there are many trees), you can see the closer parking. And to the right (it is hard to see but there are some cars) you can see the further parking (close to road #918).

Ein Tina

In the far, you can see Agamon Hula. And you can spot it by the air balloon near Agamon market.

Returning using the blue trail took us about half an hour. And in total (including the walk to the further parking and stops at the pools and waterfall), we spent 3 hours at Ein Tina. Thus a typical visit will probably be 2 – 4 hours.

The blue trail at Ein Tina
The blue trail at Ein Tina

Summary

Ein Tina (Ein Notera) offers a charming water hike that perfectly suits the hot summer days. Both the adults and the children enjoyed the hike. But before visiting, you should read about the trails, including the age restrictions comment.

There are many attractions in this area, and you can explore them using the interactive map above.

Have you visited Ein Tina? Tell us in the comment below about your experience.

That’s all for today, and I’ll see you in future travels!

Stay Tuned!

   

Additional Resources

Here are several resources that I created to help travelers: And if you have any questions then check out Useful Information For Tourists To Israel.  
Did not find what you were looking for? Email me at hi@israel-in-photos.com, and I will do my best to answer your questions.

Lev Tsimbler

Lev from israel-in-photos.com. You can contact me at hi@israel-in-photos.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Posts