Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered – Visitors Guide

Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered

The Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered presents many old tractors and other old items, and it is a lovely attraction for families.

Note: if your family loves such attractions, see The Truck Museum, Ramla.

Map

The Museum of Tractors is situated in Moshav Ein Vered, near Tel Mond. And the easiest way to reach this spot is by entering the “Museum of Tractors” into Waze or clicking this link.

Directions for drivers: Link to Waze and Link to Google Maps
Directions for public transport: Link to Moovit

Interactive map of the area:

Offers:

  • Hotels, hostels, and appartments in this area:
Booking.com

There is a big dirt parking near the museum. Here you can see part of it:

Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered
Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered

And here is a map of the museum:

Map of Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered
Map of Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered

Entrance Fee

Regular entrance: 30 NIS per person.
Entrance + riding in a tractor-drawn wagon: 50 NIS per person.

Note: admission is free for children up to one and a half years old.

Opening Hours

Sunday – Tuesday and Thursday – Friday: 8:30 – 13:00
Saturday and holidays: 9:00 – 13:00
Wednesday – closed

Note: the opening hours were updated in November 2022.

Opening Hours
Opening Hours

Contact Information

Phone: 09-979-2960
Email: itzik4x6zh@gmail.com
Facebook: erezTractors
Website: tractor.org.il

Restrooms

As you can see on the museum’s map, there are restrooms behind the cash register.

Tractors Exhibition

Our latest visit was during election day in 2022. We purchased regular tickets, including a tractor ride, and the cashier told us we had time till the ride. Thus we started exploring the tractors exhibition.

Universal Carrier
Universal Carrier

Most of the exhibits have explanation signs. Usually, the signs tell only about the vehicle, but in some cases, they also describe how a car changed history. For example, this Ford was mainly used to evacuate casualties and protect water pipes leading to the Negev.

Ford, V8, 1937
Ford, V8, 1937

Near some tractors, you can see photos of before and after restoration. Here is one example:

Ferguson, 35, 1963
Ferguson, 35, 1963

When looking back at the entrance area, you can see tables with various activities for kids. There are also small tractors and bicycles that kids can ride (like the green tractor in the next photo).

Museum of Tractors
Museum of Tractors

You can also see the coffee and tea station in the photo above.

Activities for kids
Activities for kids

It is forbidden to climb the tractors at the exhibition. Thus it is good they have activities for kids.

Here are several additional photos from the tractor exhibition:

Allis, HD5, 1951
Allis, HD5, 1951

This Potato planter was brought from Germany by the Templars:

Potato planter, 1922
Potato planter, 1922

Lanz 1937

And here is the story of one tractor:

The tractor was found in an abandoned shed on the Shenlar farm north of Kfar Menahem. In August 1948, it was not in a workable condition. According to the people of Kfar Menahem, it worked until 1946. In my opinion, it arrived here in 1937 or 1938 because in 1939, when the Second World War broke out, all the Germans were arrested by the mandate government as citizens of an enemy country and were exiled to Australia.

Later, their lands were worked by Arabs who received permission from the British mandate authority. Shenlar was a protestant missionary who arrived in Jerusalem in 1856. In 1860 Shenlar went to Lebanon to collect Christian orphans who lost their families in the slaughter carried out by the Muslims and the Druze. He brought a group of homeless orphans, got money from Germany, his country, and started the Syrian Orphanage, the official name of the German Mission in Jerusalem in Shenlar’s name, which still exists there. The institution developed and became known for a very high standard of professional training. They learned trades such as carpentry and metalwork according to European standards, which did not exist in this country then. After the First World War, the institute absorbed Armenian boys and girls, orphans of the slaughter of the Armenians by the Turks.

At the beginning of the last century (1910), the institute opened branches in Nazareth and Ramleh. Today, in kibbutz Netzer Sirene (Dir Salim), there is a large farmhouse erected by Shenlar’s son, who inherited the running and development of the institute from his father. On this farm, their main occupation was the growing of citrus.

A short time after this, in 1912, a farm was established near the Arab village of Hama, north of Kfar Menahem. On this farm, they cultivated field crops, and the institute’s students in Jerusalem specialized in agricultural work on European standards. A tin shed was put up, and living quarters and storehouses made of coarse gravel rocks (Kurkar) were brought from the Mer’ad quarries by Givat Brenner. As I said, in 1939, all the Germans were exiled from the country, and the farmlands were taken over by an Arab Effendi from Ramleh. The Arabs used the LANZ tractor on their land.

After spending a year in the farmhouse, the members of Revadim moved to their permanent site in 1949. They towed the tractor from the Shenlar farm to this site, which remained until the summer of 2002 when it became part of the tractor collection.

Natan Eidlin,
Kibbutz Revadim, Dec. 28 ,2000.

Source: official site

Lanz, Bulldog, 1937
Lanz, Bulldog, 1937

Here is a Grain Thresher that was used in threshing mostly lentils and beans:

Grain Thresher, Case, 1922
Grain Thresher, Case, 1922
Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered
Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered

There are many tractors in this hangar. Hard to know how many, but the list of tractors on the official site has about 200 names.

Here is a general view of the museum:

Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered
Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered
Leyland, Nuffield, 1958
Leyland, Nuffield, 1958
Man, 1953
Man, 1953
Oliver, 2150, 1968
Oliver, 2150, 1968
Museum of Tractors
Museum of Tractors

Riding in a Tractor-drawn Wagon

When we finished exploring the tractor exhibition, we heard an announcement saying our ride was about to start. So we headed to the parking lot.

Riding in a Tractor-drawn Wagon
Riding in a Tractor-drawn Wagon

It was about a twenty-minute ride with approximately six stops. The drive was in nearby agricultural fields, and at each stop, our guide told us about vegetables, fruits, and flowers grown there.

At one of the stops, we saw the modern electrical water pump. It was quite small. And at the entry to the museum, you can see the engine from 1936, which was used to pump the water.

Engine - 1936
Engine – 1936

The Beginning of the Settlement Exhibition

After the ride, we returned to the museum and saw the beginning of the Settlement Exhibition.

Old Samovar
Old Samovar

This exhibition presents many old items from different aspects of life.

Here are several photos:

The Beginning of the Settlement Exhibition
The Beginning of the Settlement Exhibition
Gramophone
Gramophone
Phones
Phones
The Beginning of the Settlement Exhibition
The Beginning of the Settlement Exhibition
Cameras
Cameras

Near this exhibition, you can find a small train car and a firetruck. Kids can climb both of these vehicles.

Fire engine
Fire engine

About

Our country has several collectors of old tractors and agricultural equipment. The collectors are all very keen and spend a great deal of time and money acquiring and repairing this equipment, much to enhance their surroundings. One of the best-known collectors is Erez Milshtein from Ein-Vered, where tractors have been collected since the beginning of the last century – those tractors used by the farmers to redeem the country.

When Erez left farming, he began to collect item after item, discovering what was hidden in the beautiful scenery and the rubbish dumps of the moshavim, the kibbutzim, and the settlements. In one decade, Erez has saved more than a hundred items of motorized equipment and dozens of allied items, most of which have been repaired to a mobile state or are still being reconstructed. Later on, Yair Misch joined with his life-work collection of artifacts such as craftsman tools, ornaments, and equipment, the “Agron” (derived from the word gather)

To promote the vision, we established, on 6 October 2003, a non-profit organization (number: 580403111): “Lev-Hasharon Museum (private) for the history of tractors, agricultural machinery, and rural space” aiming.

Source: official site

Summary

We spent about 1.5 hours in the Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered. It was a fun experience, and the whole family enjoyed it.

For additional attractions in this area, browse the interactive map at the beginning of this article.

See Attractions in Tel Aviv with Kids for additional places for families.

Have you ever been to the Museum of Tractors in Ein Vered? Tell us about your experience in the comments below.

That’s all for today, and I’ll see you in future travels!

Stay Tuned!

   

Additional Resources

Here are several resources that I created to help travelers: And if you have any questions then check out Useful Information For Tourists To Israel.  
Did not find what you were looking for? Leave a comment below, and I will do my best to answer your questions.

Lev Tsimbler

Lev from israel-in-photos.com. You can contact me at hi@israel-in-photos.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Posts